Analytical Instrumentation

  • An Update on the ASTM D1319 Dye Crisis for Jet Fuel
    Figure 1. The VUV Analyzer Platform for Fuels is capable of many types of fuels analysis, all on a single platform.
  • Figure 2. ASTM D8267-19a correlation data to ASTM D1319.

An Update on the ASTM D1319 Dye Crisis for Jet Fuel

Jan 22 2020 Read 857 Times

Since the announcement the VUV Analyzer™ Platform for Fuels, VUV Analytics has developed several applications for fast, easy, and accurate analysis of several types of fuels, all possible on one platform as illustrated in Figure 1. These include ASTM D8071 for gasoline, ASTM D8267 for jet fuel, and Verified Hydrocarbon Analysis™, with more to come.

As with the constantly evolving world of fuel regulations, these methods are also evolving, specifically ASTM D8267. Let’s review how we got to where we are today and what’s coming in the future!

What is the status of the ASTM D1319?

When it was announced in December 2018 that the dye used in ASTM D1319 was no longer available, many refineries and testing labs went searching for alternative methods. This dye mishap has also been a concern for the D02 Jet Committee for most of 2019. The main issue is that the legacy dye was no longer being manufactured and five batches of replacement dye were banned for measuring aromatics in fuels, including jet fuel. 

The manufacturer of the ASTM D1319 dye has created a prototype formula of the dye that is purportedly “chemically equivalent” to the original D1319 dye. An ASTM ruggedness study was completed comparing the legacy dye to this prototype dye. This study accomplished an initial evaluation of dye efficacy, but the study may have biased interpretation of the results because the samples were not blinded. The conclusion was that the dyes were “same but different”. It appears the jet committee wants to continue with the use of the circa-1950’s D1319 method with the prototype dye. This will ultimately depend on a revision of the FAA SAIB, which is still in effect for D1319, and does not currently allow for the use of prototype dye. An ASTM D6300 compliant ILS for the protype dye is under consideration by ASTM.

Jet Fuel Analysis – ASTM D8267-19a

In response to the D1319 Dye Crisis, VUV Analytics swiftly developed a jet fuel method for measuring aromatics, ASTM D8267, that is comparable to ASTM D1319 and other methods available today. An ILS and ASTM approval of D8267 were accomplished in 2019.  Aromatic content is an important property of jet fuel and VUV Analytics is now balloting for ASTM D8267 to be included in the ASTM D1655 specification. Figure 2 shows the correlation of ASTM D8267 compared to ASTM D1319 for a large data set of various jet fuel types.

Many jet fuel experts realise that in addition to measuring aromatics, you also must report net heat of combustion to certify jet fuel. ASTM D3338 is a commonly used technique. In addition to gaining ASTM D1655 recognition, VUV Analytics is also balloting a revision of ASTM D3338 to allow the use of D8267. The expectation is that approval of D8267 in the D1655 specification and D3338 method by mid-April 2020. 

By: Dan Wispinski, Standard Methods Development Manager

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